Animal Traction in Kenya

Resources available on animal traction in Kenya
The following documents relating to animal traction in Kenya can be viewed and/or downloaded in pdf format: Some of these documents derive from ATNESA workshops or the workshops of the West Africa Animal Traction Network. Some have been prepared by animal traction specialists for other collaborating organisations or networks. 
(If you do not have Adobe Acrobat 4 which is needed to view and print these pdf files, you can download it free of charge from http://www.adobe.com)

Most papers have file sizes between 150 kb and 500 kb. Depending on the speed of your connection, these files will take between one and four minutes to download. Papers with photographs generally have larger files and these are marked in yellow (over one megabyte) or red (over two megabytes) and these will take longer to download. 

Farmer-led adoption of ox weeding in Machakos District, Kenya
	by Kate Wellard and Mike Mortimore
Possible use of wild animals in provision of draught power in the 21st Century 
	by R. M. Mwanzia
Comparison of haematological changes and strongyle faecal egg counts in donkeys in Kiambu district, 
Kenya
	by A.K. Lewa, T.A. Ngatia, W.K. Munyua and N.E. Maingi
Pathological lesions associated with internal parasitosis in donkeys in Kiambu district, Kenya 
	by A.K. Lewa, T.A. Ngatia, W.K. Munyua and N.E. Maingi
Animal powered transport of goods in a diverse temporal and spatial environment: a case study of 
Lari, Central Kenya 
	by J Mutua and J N Mwangi
Animal-powered weeding: experience in western Kenya
	by Phares Odiewuor Okello and Barasa Sitati Wasike
Participatory technology development for animal traction: experiences from a semi-arid area of Kenya
	by David Mellis, Harriet Matsaert and Boniface Mwaniki
Animal traction and sustainable soil productivity in Kenya
	by Isaiah I C Wakindiki
A note on gender issues in draft animal technology: experiences from Nyanza, Kenya 
	by William Onyango Ochido
A note on weed control in Machakos District, Kenya
	by C O Mwanda
Donkey power in the context of smallholder mechanisation and agribusiness in Kenya
	by Pascal Kaumbutho, Elizabeth Waithanji and A Karimi
Some challenges to the use of donkeys in Kenya
	by Joseph Mutua
The use of donkeys for transport in Kajiado, Kenya
	by Jo Leyland
Socio-economic and gender issues in draft animal technology: a lady farmerís commentary
                by T.B. Ngamau   
A note on the potential profitability of animal traction in Nakuru District, Kenya
       by Paul Mugo Maina	    
Tillage and weed control on medium potential lands in Kenya
      by  J M Kahumbura	  
Women's access to animal traction technology: cases studies from Darfur, Sudan and Turkana, Kenya
      by  Simon Croxton	    
Work on animal power harness technology in Kenya
      by  Luurt Oudman	     
Reducing present constraints to the use of animal power in Kenya
      by  S O Onyango                                                             
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Working camels: extension leaflets
The following leaflets on camel management and utilisation were prepared by KENDAT and FarmAfrica
(all contain colour photographs; some have draft  layout features) 

Camel selection 360 kb** 
Camel utilisation 340 ** 
Camel harnessing 440 kb** 
Camel training 380 kb ** 
Camel health 250 kb **  

See also KENDAT publications and workshops

See also ATNESA Donkey workshop


Animal traction contacts in Kenya: click here  

Kenya Network for Draught Animal Technology (KENDAT)
PO Box 2859, City Square, 00200, Nairobi, KENYA
Tel: + 254-2-766939; Fax: + 254-2-766939
Email: KENDAT@africaonline.co.ke

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